“Donald Wallenfang has followed up his wonderful book on sacramental theology with an equally wonderful book on the theological anthropology of Edith Stein. . . . Without any disservice to the complexity and profundity of Stein’s thought, Wallenfang has repurposed her to speak critically and hopefully to our postmodern situation. Wallenfang continues to show himself to be a deep Catholic thinker worthy of our attention.” — Cyril O'Regan, Huisking Professor of Theology, University of Notre Dame

“Wallenfang's book deals with a central topic in Edith Stein's investigations. Examining the meaning of human being and divine Being, the author pinpoints the main aspect of Stein's research starting from her phenomenological analyses as far as her book on theological anthropology and underscoring the influence of St. Thomas Aquinas on her interpretation of the relationship between man and God. In my opinion, Wallenfang’s book will be a contribution to the knowledge of Edith Stein’s philosophical and theological thought.” — Angela Ales Bello, Professor Emeritus of History of Contemporary Philosophy and Phenomenology of Religion, Lateran University